Blog

CFP: Green Criminology Conference In London

“London South Bank University will be hosting a two-day Green Criminology conference on the 7th and 8th of July 2014. This conference is the culmination of an ESRC funded seminar series running in the UK since 2012.

We are inviting submissions of abstracts for those wishing to present papers in any area of green, environmental or conservation criminology or related areas. Empirical, theoretical or conceptual papers are all welcome.

Abstracts should be no more than 300 words in length and should be sent to Dr Gary Potter at potterg@lsbu.ac.uk no later than 16th April 2014.

The conference will reflect the themes of the existing seminar series and also any other research related to green criminology and environmental victimisation.

As such we have 6 streams:
1. Green Criminology: theories and concepts.
2. Wildlife and Timber Trafficking.
3. Wildlife Crime and Animal Abuse.
4. Hazardous Waste and Pollution.
5. Environmental Law and Regulation.
6. Other aspects of green criminology, conservation criminology and environmental victimisation.

The conference will also include a roundtable discussion on future considerations for green criminology concepts, theories and methods, and future research collaborations.

Confirmed keynote speakers:
Rob White (University of Tasmania), Reece Walters (Queensland University of Technololgy), Ragnhild Sollund (University of Oslo), Nigel South (University of Essex), Avi Brisman (East Kentucky University), Damien Short (University of…

Green Criminology Events at ASC

IGCWG member Avi Brisman has put together a list of Green Criminology events happening at this years ASC. Please consult the below schedule and please attend the International Green Criminology Working Group Meeting on…

Upcoming Green Crime Conference In London

We would like to spread the word about an upcoming conference in London. The National Environmental Crime Conference 2013, “Perspectives on the use of technology and crime science to prevent environmental crime”, will be taking place on Wednesday 27th November, 2013 at 30 Euston Square, London, NW1 2FB.

“Environmental crime and eco-security matter—and are increasingly on the agendas of national and local government. Existing and new threats are a growing problem that are having a direct impact on the global environment and human wellbeing. This fourth UK National Environmental Crime Conference brings together industry and academic expertise with practitioners and policymakers to discuss a range of current and future problems such as wildlife crime, industrial pollution and illegal waste disposal.

The conference will feature talks from Interpol, the Environment Agency, NGO’s, academics and technology companies such as Smartwater, as well as a ‘Question Time’ panel debate hosted by the BBC Crimewatch presenter, Nick Ross. Registration for this event costs £25 and includes a full-day conference with a buffet lunch (£20 of this fee will be donated to a participating eco-charity.) Alternatively, if you are a science or technology company that would like to exhibit at the event, please contact Joanna Hill at joanna.hill.11@ucl.ac.uk”

To register for this event, please visit our website:
https://connect.innovateuk.org/web/national-environmental-crime-conferences

A preliminary schedule and full event flyer availab…

“Visual” Green Criminology? – The Green Criminology Monthly #13 – September 2013

Thank you to everyone who has read, written, and contributed to the Green Criminology Monthly since our debut in September of last year. This article by Chris J. Moloney is our 13th release and marks our first year as an online journal. Each month we publish an issue of The Green Criminology Monthly, written and edited by members of the International Green Criminology Working Group.

The Green Criminology Monthly is a source of original research and publication on green criminology, environmental crime, and other issues concerning criminology.

The article is available below in its full form, and is also available as a downloadable PDF file on our Monthly Archive Page.

“Visual” Green Criminology?
Some thoughts on the future of green crime studies
Christopher J. Moloney
Center for the Study of Crime and Justice
Department of Sociology
Colorado State University

Abstract

In this edition of the Green Criminology Monthly, I suggest that green criminologists begin thinking about the future of the discipline and its role in our modern “green” culture. Since green criminologists are, by definition, positioned at a crossroads of highly relevant topical research spanning the realms of crime, harm, victimization and the environment, it seems only fitting that they seek novel ways for conducting their research and conveying their findings to others. In addition to some other considerations green criminologists might keep in mind as the discipline moves forward, I discuss how adopting visual methods into green crime research projects might be especially useful for expanding our knowledge of green crimes. I hope, once again, to provide some “food-for-thought” for both established scholars and those new to the discipline.

The Importance of Green and Green Criminology

As consumers we can now choose from a host of “green” products; we can judge the quality of a corporation based on how green its business…

Special Critical Criminology Issue With New Green Crim Article

A special issue of “Critical Criminology” contains a new article by Vincenzo Ruggiero and ICGWG member Nigel South titled “Green Criminology and Crimes of the Economy: Theory, Research and Praxis”, that we are very excited to announce.

“This paper describes several key developments and dimensions in the field of ‘green criminology’ and discusses some of the relevant debates and controversies arising. It then outlines overlaps and connections with other areas of work within critical criminology. The central focus of the paper is on crimes of the economy as they affect the environment and a substantive, illustrative case study is provided on environmental crimes and harms asso- ciated with the oil industry. The paper concludes with some critical observations on where directions in theory, policy and practice may need to turn in a post-growth world.”

A sample of the article is available here (click “Look Inside”).

The entire issue and articles are available for purchase online here, with free samples of each article.

The Green Criminology Monthly #11 – July 2013 – Green Crimes as Invisible Crimes

Welcome to the eleventh issue of The Green Criminology Monthly by the IGCWG. Written and reviewed by the members of the International Green Criminology Working Group, The Green Criminology Monthly is a source of original research and publication on green criminology, environmental crime, and other issues concerning criminology. Each month a issue of this publication will be posted to our blog.

The article is available below in its full form, and is also available as a downloadable PDF file on our Monthly Archive Page.

Green Crimes as Invisible Crimes
Tanya Wyatt

Department of Social Sciences and Languages
Northumbria University

In 1999, Jupp et al theorized as to why certain crimes and harms remain hidden from public knowledge and scrutiny though they cause suffering and victimization. Drawing on the work of Pearce (1976) and his explorations of crimes of the powerful, they developed the seven features of invisibility that interact to in effect make these crimes and harms ‘invisible’ though there is awareness of their existence. Their examples included violence against women, health and safety violations, and white-collar crime. In this short essay, I will be applying the seven features that make a crime invisible to green crimes in general. First, I will summarize what the seven features are and then I will go through each in turn using various examples of green crimes to illustrate the applicability of the feature.

The Seven Features of Invisibility

As Michael Long indicated in last month’s post, crime is a social and political construction and this is connected to the actions of powerful people who are able to control what is and is not defined as a crime (Pearce 1976). Additionally, Jupp et al (1999) argue even if something is criminalized, powerful actors are able to keep these crimes (and harms) hidden. They propose there are seven features that contribute to the invisibility of crimes – they are: no knowledge, no…

Call for Papers for Upcoming “Brown Crime: Hazardous Waste and Pollution” Conference

We would like to announce a call for papers for an upcoming conference to be hosted in the United Kingdom.

Brown Crime: Hazardous Waste and Pollution will be held on October 4th, 2013 at Northumbria University in Newcastle, UK.

Call for Papers open until 15 August. Please send your 300 word abstract to tanya.wyatt@northumbria.ac.uk.

There will be no fee for the conference. Lunch and tea will be provided.

Judith van Erp, Marieke Kluin and Lieselot Bisschop are confirmed keynot…

Congratulations to Dr. Lorenzo Natali

We wanted to congratulate Dr. Lorenzo Natali (University of Milano-Bicocca) for being awarded the Filippo Gramatica prize for the best scientific contribution in the field of social defense. Dr. Natali won this award because of his excellent paper entitled “The Contemporary Horizon of Green Criminology” that details the development of green criminology. That paper is available in the “Routledge International Handbook of Green Criminology”. The editors of that handbook are IGCWG members Nigel South (University of Essex-England) and Avi Brisman (Eastern Kentucky University–USA).

The prize honors the memory of Prof. Filippo Gramatica and is awarded to by a panel of professors to the author of the best scientific contribution in the field of social protection every two years. Details of the award (in Italian, of course!) are available at this…

“Emerging Issues in Green Criminology” Now Available Worldwide

We are proud to announce that Emerging Issues in Green Criminology: Exploring Power, Justice, and Harm is now available worldwide.

Emerging Issues in Green Criminology is an edited collection, examining the role of green criminology throughout the world and the social and criminological implications of environmental harm. “The book unifies transnational debates in environmental law, policy and justice, and in doing so examines international agreements and policy within diverse environmental discourses of sociology, criminology and political economy.”

Emerging Issues in Green Criminology: Exploring Power, Justice, and Harm contains contributions from over 10 members of the IGCWG, making it a truly collaborative effort of scholars studying environmental harm.

GreenCriminology.org has partnered with Palgrave Publishing to provide 20% off the paperback edition of the book. Just enter “WGRECR2013a” during checkout when ordering online from Palgrave.com (US Customers use this link).

Michael J. Lynch, IGCWG Member, gives the book a strong endorsement:

“Emerging Issues in Green Criminology is an important collection of work that helps move the discussion of green criminology toward fuller recognition of the role power plays in the construction of green crime, their commissions, and the legal and nonlegal responses to those crimes and harms. The result is a work that will become the foundation for expanding the theoretical analysis of power within green criminology, and making power analysis central to green criminological analysis.”
- Michael J. Lynch, University of South Florida, USA

“Emerging Issues in Green Criminology is an essential source for students, scholars and policy makers in this rapidly growing area of criminology, as well as environmental studies more broadly. The international range of contributors include Lieselot Bisschop (University College Ghent, Belgium), Avi Brisman (Eastern Kentucky University, USA), Matthew Hall (University…

The Green Criminology Monthly #10 – June 2013 – Some Thoughts on the Dependent Variable in Studies of Green Crime

Welcome to the tenth issue of The Green Criminology Monthly by the IGCWG. Written and reviewed by the members of the International Green Criminology Working Group, The Green Criminology Monthly is a source of original research and publication on green criminology, environmental crime, and other issues concerning criminology. Each month a issue of this publication will be posted to our blog.

The article is available below in its full form, and is also available as a downloadable PDF file on our Monthly Archive Page.

Some Thoughts on the Dependent Variable in Studies of Green Crime
Michael Long
Department of Sociology
Oklahoma State University

What is a green crime? When does an act move from being just environmentally hazardous to a full-blown green crime? These are questions that green criminologists often wrestle with, either when attempting to explain the field of green criminology to students or uninitiated colleagues, or more importantly, when designing studies to analyze the correlates and causes of green crimes. In this essay, I would like to address these issues through a discussion of the choices green criminologists have to make when selecting a dependent variable (i.e. the measure of green crime) for analysis. In this essay, to present my argument clearly, I focus primarily on quantitative studies. However the discussion below would apply equally to measures of green crime in qualitative studies. This essay proceeds as follows. First, I briefly discuss the social construction of crime literature. Next, I review previous research that suggests that green criminology should focus on harms. I then turn to an examination of possible dependent variables in studies of green crime. The discussion stresses the importance of selecting a dependent variable that measures environmental harm, not adherence to a socially constructed environmental law. I also suggest that further theoretical development that takes a politica…

Copyright ©2012. All Rights Reserved. Site Version 1.04.