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ASC Division on Critical Criminology Invites Nominations for this Year’s Awards

The ASC Division on Critical Criminology (DCC) invites nominations for this year’s awards. This year, the DCC will sponsor six (6) awards:

· The Lifetime Achievement Award honors an individual’s sustained and distinguished scholarship, teaching, and/or service in the field of critical criminology.

· The Critical Criminologist of the Year Award honors an early-to-mid-career individual’s distinguished accomplishments that have symbolized the spirit of the DCC in some form of scholarship, teaching, and/or service in recent years.

· The DCC Praxis Award recognizes an individual whose professional accomplishments have increased the quality of justice for groups that have experienced class, ethnic, gender, racial and sexual disparities in policing and punishment. The DCC Award for Contribution to Practice honors unique achievements in activism, commitment, persuasion, scholarship, service and teaching in areas that have made a significant impact on the quality of justice for underserved, underrepresented, and otherwise marginalized populations.

· The DCC Practice Award recognizes the activist/practitioner who has participated in publicly promoting and working towards the ideals of equality, justice and rights as they relate to the differential distribution of power in criminal justice and throughout society more generally. Nominees need not be criminologists or even academics, for that matter. Nominations should include specific documentation of public service and should describe in detail how this person’s activism has raised awareness and interest in the issues that concern the DCC.

· The Graduate Student Paper Award recognizes and honors outstanding theoretical or empirical critical criminological scholarship by a graduate student.

· The Undergraduate Student Paper Award recognizes and honors outstanding theoretical or empirical critical criminological scholarship by an undergraduate student.

CWOB Crimes Against the Environment Report (Download)

Earlier this year Criminologists without Borders began an initiative to develop a pamphlet for April’s UN Commission on Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice meeting. This year’s meeting, which took place in Vienna, “discussed “challenges posed by emerging forms of crime that have a significant impact on the environment and ways to deal with it effectively”.”

“To inform the Commission’s discussion on this topic, Criminologists Without Borders prepared an 8-page summary for representatives of UN member states summarizing current research on this topic.”

The report was completed and handed out at the meeting in April. IGCWG member Gohar Petrossian, principal author on this report, said that the “that the handout was very well received by the attending parties.”

The report, which contains policy recommendations and information on illegal fishing and wildlife trade, logging, and other environmental crimes, is now available to download for all those interested. You can download the file by visiting either of the below links.

Direct link to document.

Criminologists without Borders…

“Environment, Crime and Conflict” Presentation in London

IGCWG Members Nigel South and Avi Brisman will be giving a talk at University College London titled “Environment, Crime and Conflict: Typologies of Relationships and Representation,” on Tuesday, May 21st from 5-6pm. Please see the bottom of the post for the address of this talk.

Presentation abstract:

Environment, Crime and Conflict: Typologies of Relationships and Representation

“This presentation outlines two typologies. The first covers examples of environmental crimes and harms related to conditions of conflict and war, exploitation and resistance. Case studies and other sources are used to illustrate these examples. The second explores representations of forms of ‘conflict and environment’ relationships. The paper builds on a series of projects, including writing on the intertwining of environmental and human rights , the preparation of an edited volume on environmental crime and social conflict, and ongoing work on cultural and media representations of environmental harms.”

Address:
University College of London
Department of Security and Crime Science
35 Tavistock Square,
London, WC1H 9EZ

Copy Provided by Joanna Hill, UCL’s Security and Crime Scienc…

The Green Criminology Monthly #9 – May 2013 – Book Review: Animal Harm: Perspectives on Why People Harm and Kill Animals

Welcome to the ninth issue of The Green Criminology Monthly by the IGCWG. Written and reviewed by the members of the International Green Criminology Working Group, The Green Criminology Monthly is a source of original research and publication on green criminology, environmental crime, and other issues concerning criminology. Each month a issue of this publication will be posted to our blog.

The article is available below in its full form, and is also available as a downloadable PDF file on our Monthly Archive Page.

Book Review: Animal Harm: Perspectives on Why People Harm and Kill Animals
Glen Wright
School of Law
Australian National University

Angus Nurse, Animal Harm: Perspectives on Why People Harm and Kill Animals., (Ashgate, 2013)

What makes people harm, injure, or kill animals? Angus Nurse’s book, Animal Harm, opens by posing this complex question – one frequently addressed from a range of perspectives: sociological, psychological and criminological. Animal Harm represents an ambitious effort to bring these diverse discussions together in one concise volume.

Situated as it is in the field of Green Criminology, Nurse’s book at times struggles with some seeming contradictions related to distinguishing illegal animal harms from those harms that are legally allowable but nevertheless harmful to animals.  In this sense, the broad nature of the book’s title and the initial question are somewhat at odds with the Green Criminology perspective.  I will return to these issues after briefly summarizing the book’s content.

The text focuses on a diverse range of discrete animal harms: domestic animals; field sports; culture and self-expression; sport and trophy hunting; and trade in wildlife. Having set out the various types of harm, the author considers the effectiveness of current legislation, policy and sentencing, including an assessment of the (limited) international law responses.

Nurse evaluates the reasons for…

The Green Criminology Monthly #8 – April 2013 – Green Criminology in Action

Welcome to the eighth issue of The Green Criminology Monthly by the IGCWG. Written and reviewed by the members of the International Green Criminology Working Group, The Green Criminology Monthly is a source of original research and publication on green criminology, environmental crime, and other issues concerning criminology. Each month a issue of this publication will be posted to our blog.

The article is available below in its full form, and is also available as a downloadable PDF file on our Monthly Archive Page.

Green Criminology in Action
Melissa L. Jarrell
School of Social Sciences
Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi

This entry is adapted from a forthcoming book chapter: Jarrell, Melissa L. and Ozymy, Joshua. “Communities as Victims of Environmental Crime: Lessons from the Field” for the Delft conference on Environmental Crime and its Victims and an invited talk: “Toxic Crimes and Environmental Injustice: Research in the Sacrifice Zones”, sponsored by Colorado State University, Department of Sociology.

Researchers engaging in green criminological research and activists fighting for the environment and public health must take into consideration several challenges inherent in these pursuits. For one, the immediate consequences of an environmental offense may not appear obvious or severe. People may not become sick from exposure to toxic pollution, for example, for decades after their exposure. Consequently, green crime does not fit most people’s perceptions of crime. Researchers must be prepared for the complexities associated with green crime research. It is possible to change public conceptions about certain issues but not without extensive time and effort. For example, we can look to the political and public attitudes toward smoking that have changed significantly since the 1960s, when the Surgeon General reported on the health hazards associated with smoking cigarettes. Numerous studies have shown that cigarett…

Call For Papers: Contemporary Justice Review entitled “Animals & Issues of Law and Justice.”

This call for papers is also available as a Word Doc and a PDF.

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS
Contemporary Justice Review
Special Issue: Animals & Issues of Law and Justice
Final Deadline: March 31, 2014

Contemporary Justice Review is calling for paper submissions addressing the topic “Animals & Issues of Law and Justice” for a special issue of the journal. While the disciplines of Animal Law, Sociology, Psychology, Sociology, Anthropology, and Biological Sciences, etc., publish extensively on issues concerns of non-human animals is interdisciplinary yet largely absent in criminology and justice studies. Therefore, bringing much needed attention to issues surrounding use, abuse, and research of animals demands CJR attention.
Contemporary Justice Review prefers articles written in accessible prose which avoids academic jargon and offers insights fostering justice in daily life, in this context, daily life involves the range of non-human animals and non-human animal companions. The proposed issue seeks papers placing non-human animals in an academic, practical, research, and other areas of interests and contexts.
Authors are encouraged to consider topics that may include, but are not limited to: animal abuse or cruelty; research on The Link involving the animal cruelty/family and/or interpersonal violence and their nexus; pet protective orders and domestic violence; animals as victims of crime; breed-specific legislation; dog- and cock-fighting and the connection to gang culture or other matters of justice; the development and evolution of animal law regarding areas of animal cruelty and animal welfare in various jurisdictions; an analysis of the philosophies of animal rights vs. utilitarianism; the use of animal assisted therapy when working with at-risk youth; historical analyses of the animal rights movement; the role of animal control agencies in dealing with crimes against animals; animal welfare issues generally (i.e., the treatment of animals used in…

Publication Announcement: Climate Change and Crime: Monthly Temperature and Precipitation Anomalies and Crime Rates in St. Louis, MO 1990–2009

“Abstract:

This study provides insights on how climate change may already be impacting crime rates. Based on analysis of 20 years of monthly data from St. Louis, MO, this study finds that most major crime types are likely to be impacted by rising temperatures. Whereas previous studies on the impact of climate change have used annual data, the current study suggests that shorter time periods provide a more accurate assessment once seasonality effects are accounted for. What is more this study incorporates not just temperature data, but also precipitation data. Results indicate that the relation between climate change and crime is significant for most crime categories. While the strength of the relationship between temperature anomalies and crime may appear relatively mild, considering potential future warming, climate change may come to have a significant impact on crime rates. Theory and policy implications are discussed.”

Article available for free viewing online or as PDF download at…

The Green Criminology Monthly #7 – March 2013 – On the Parallels between Studies of Green and State Crimes

Welcome to the seventh issue of The Green Criminology Monthly by the IGCWG. Written and reviewed by the members of the International Green Criminology Working Group, The Green Criminology Monthly is a source of original research and publication on green criminology, environmental crime, and other issues concerning criminology. Each month a issue of this publication will be posted to our blog.

The article is available below in its full form, and is also available as a downloadable PDF file on our Monthly Archive Page. We have stopped providing .DOC versions of The Monthly due to a lack of use, but it can be made available on request by emailing greencriminology (at) gmail.com

On the Parallels between Studies of Green and State Crimes
Christopher Moloney
School of Social Sciences
Colorado State University

Introduction

The goal of this brief essay is to acknowledge the parallels between green and state crime research. Green criminologists should attend to whether or not the particular green issue they are working on might be framed simultaneously as both a green and state crime. That is, moving forward, green crime scholars whose work intersects with environmental harms, social harms and state actions or inactions should strive for a “green crime/state crime” synthesis. Ideally, this essay will hold interest to established green crime researchers, but I am especially hopeful that young researchers new to the green crime discipline will find this essay informative and potentially helpful as they seek to develop their own green crime scholarship.

Towards a Green Crime/State Crime Synthesis

The origins of both green and state crime studies can be traced to the rise of critical and radical criminology in the 1960s (Chambliss et al. 2010; Lynch 1990; Yar 2012). It is fair to say, without belaboring the point, that these anti-establishment roots with foci on issues of environmental and social justice intimately link the two…

Colorado State University Lecture: “Toxic Crimes and Environmental Injustice: Research in the Sacrifice Zones”

On March 11th, IGCWG Member Dr. Melissa Jarrell will be giving a lecture at Colorado State University. Her talk is titled “Toxic Crimes and Enviornmental Injustice: Research in the Sacrifice Zones” and is part of the Sociology in Progress Lecture Series.

The talk will be held from noon to 1 P.M. on March 11th in the Lory Student Center Room 228 at Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado.

Here is a copy of the event flyer:
(Click to enlarge)

(Click to…

Call for Chapters: “Europe & the New Austerity: Case Studies in Social, Financial & Environmental Sustainability”

CALL FOR CHAPTERs
The Advances in Sustainability and Environmental Justice Series with Emerald Group Publishing

(Formerly Advances in Ecopolitics)

Is issuing a call for chapters for Volume 1 of our new series:

Europe & the New Austerity: Case Studies in Social, Financial & Environmental Sustainability
(Leonard & Gurdgiev Eds.)

This book will focus on three concepts of sustainability:

1) Fiscal / economic / social sustainability
2) Financial sustainability (sector risks etc)
3) Environmental sustainability

In addition, contributors should focus on international aspects of austerity, such as:

1) The economics of austerity covering monetary-v-fiscal adjustments, expansionary fiscal contraction, stability policies (IMF v EU) and international comparative case studies.

2) Country-specific experiences: Iceland, Ireland, Greece, Spain, Portugal, as well as more structural adjustment countries – Sweden, Finland, Belgium etc.

3) The social aspects of austerity, impacts, outcomes, futures etc.

4) The political dimension (including analyses of European Social Model).

5) Environmental Sustainability in a European context.

* Submission date for Chapters will be July 30th 2013.

* Proposed Publication date will be Winter 2013/2014

Submit abstracts and chapters to the Volume Editors at the following:

Liam Leonard: liam_leonard@yahoo.com
Constantin Gurdgiev: gurdgiev@gmail.com

Regards,

Liam Leonard, Constantin Gurdgiev;
Volum…

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