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The Green Criminology Monthly #5 – January 2013

This is the fifth issue of The Green Criminology Monthly by the IGCWG. Written and reviewed by the members of the International Green Criminology Working Group, The Green Criminology Monthly is a source of original research and publication on green criminology, environmental crime, and other issues concerning criminology. Each month a issue of this publication will be posted to our blog.

The article is available below in its full form, and is also available as a downloadable PDF and DOC file on our Monthly Archive Page.

Introduction to the ESRC Green Criminology Seminar Series.
Tanya Wyatt
Department of Social Sciences
Northumbria University
 

Myself, Matthew Hall, Angus Nurse, Gary Potter and Nigel South with further help from Jenny Maher have embarked upon a ground-breaking project that we hope will further the awareness and impact of green criminology not only in the UK where it is taking place, but internationally as well. We were successful in securing funding from the UK Economic and Social Research Council for a research seminar series dedicated to green criminology. The series will consist of five half-day seminars and a final two day mini-conference over nearly a two-year period.

The ESRC Green Criminology Seminar Series is designed to:

-Bring together a core group of Green Criminology scholars and students, ecological and/or conservation practitioners, environmental and wildlife law enforcement officials, and other relevant officials in order to firmly establish an international interdisciplinary network.

-Contribute to the empirical and theoretical enrichment of Green Criminology, through discussion, publication, and research collaboration.

-Expose and engage a wide audience in terms of number of participants, geographical location, career stage, and discipline through the use of webcasts of each seminar on a dedicated seminar series.

-Explore methodological issues around researching Green Crimes w…

IGCWG Member Lieselot Bisschop successfully defends her PhD in Criminology

International Green Criminology Working Group member Lieselot Bisschop successfully defended her PhD in Criminology at Ghent University on December 7th.

Her PhD research “analyses the empirical reality of governing transnational environmental crime flows. The studied cases are the illegal trade in electronic waste (e-waste) and tropical timber.

This study first examines the emergence and social organisation of these cases. This entails looking at the scope and impact of the flows and at which legal, illegal and informal actors are involved, how they interact and what drives them. Building on the gained insights, this study analyses the governance reality. Relating back to the responsive regulatory pyramid and networked governance, this study makes several observations about the governance actors and their interaction. The research setting is the Port of Antwerp and particularly the flows between Europe and West and Central Africa.

This research is based on a qualitative multi-method research design combining a document analysis of various primary and secondary sources, 81 interviews with key informants, and field visits.”

Lieselot’s PhD research has been published as five separate articles, three available now:

Bisschop, L. (2011). “Transnational environmental crime: exploring (un)charted territory.” In M. Cools et al. (Eds.), EU Criminal Justice, Financial & Economic Crime: New Perspectives, Governance of Security Research Papers (Vol. 5, pp. 155-183). Antwerpen: Maklu.

Bisschop, L. (2012). Is it all going to waste? Illegal transports of e-waste in a European trade hub. Crime, Law and Social Change, 58(3), 221-249.

Bisschop, L. (2012): Out of the woods: the illegal trade in tropical timber and a European trade hub, Global Crime, 13(3), 191-212.

And two scheduled to be published:

Bisschop, L. “Go with the e-waste flows. The governance reality of illegal transports of e-waste in a European trad…

The Green Criminology Monthly #4 – December 2012

 

This is the fourth issue of The Green Criminology Monthly by the IGCWG. Written and reviewed by the members of the International Green Criminology Working Group, The Green Criminology Monthly is a source of original research and publication on green criminology, environmental crime, and other issues concerning criminology. Each month a issue of this publication will be posted to our blog.

The article is available below in its full form, and is also available as a downloadable PDF and DOC file on our Monthly Archive Page.

Using the Treadmill of Production to Inform a Political Economy Approach to Green Criminology
Dr. Michael Long
Department of Social Sciences
Oklahoma State University

 

I would like to provide an overview of a political economy approach to green criminology.  I will first provide an overview of the treadmill of production (ToP) theoretical framework that I (along with Paul Stretesky and Michael Lynch; see: Long, et al., 2012) have adapted from environmental sociology to understand and explain green crimes in a political economy framework.  I will then use examples from the coal industry to illustrate the usefulness of the ToP approach to green criminology.

In his 1980 work, The Environment: From Surplus to Scarcity, Allan Schnaiberg described the relationship between humans and the environment.  His focus was on how and why humans contribute to environmental problems. To answer these questions, Schnaiberg posited a political economy explanation.  Political economy focuses on structural explanations, in this case, how class relations shape economic production and consequently environmental problems.  The initial formulation of the ToP focused on Post-World War II United States, but was later extended to focus on environmental problems in the global political economy.

So, what is the treadmill of production?  In short, it describes how environmental harms are the direct result of the process of…

Today at the ASC: Ideas for Recycling/Greener Efforts at the ASC Meetings

 
There will be a special round table today on the topic of reducing waste generated at ASC and improving recycling at the conference. Please see the details from our Sessions Database below:

Session Title:Ideas for Recycling/Greener Efforts at the ASC Meetings

Date & Time:Fri, Nov 16 – 11:00am – 12:20pm
Location: Burnham 5, 7th Floor

Abstract:A special round table discussion on how to reduce waste at the ASC. Look for our signs and spread the GREENER message!

Session Participants:
Meredith Worthen and Jessica Hodge (in…

Announcing A New Book on Green Criminology, Eco-Global Crimes.

Eco-Global Crimes: Contemporary Problems and Future Challenges, is the first book in the Ashgate Green Criminology Series. Eco-Global Crimes “uses empirical and theoretical arguments to discuss the multi-dimensional character of eco-global crime. It provides an overview of eco-global crimes and discusses them from a justice perspective. The persistence of animal abuse and speciesism are also examined together with policies aimed at controlling the natural world and plant species. Pollution by large corporations, rights of indigenous peoples and the damage caused by the mineral extraction are also considered.”

Eco-Global Crimes is edited by Rune Ellefsen, Guri Larsen, and Ragnhild Aslaug Sollund, who are all from the University of Oslo, and contains chapters from over ten other members in the fields of green and eco-global criminology. “Providing new ideas and insights which will be relevant on a global scale, this book is an interesting and useful study of the exploitation of nature and other species. It will be invaluable for students and scholars globally, working within or connected to the field of green and eco-global criminology. The book will also be important for the participants of various social movements, especially the environmental and animal advocacy movements.”

An outline of its contents had been provided by Ashgate Publishing:
Contents: Preface; Part I Introduction to Eco-Global Criminology: Introduction, Ragnhild Aslaug Sollund; The foundations of eco-global criminology, Rob White; The most serious crime: eco-genocide concepts and perspectives in eco-global criminology, Guri Larsen; Constructing a meta-history of eco-global criminology: on brute criminologists, mortified bunnies, nature and its discontent, Per Jørgen Ystehede. Part II Speciesism, Animal Abuse and Social Movements: The rhetorical making of a crime called speciesism: the reception of ‘animal liberation’, Kristian Bjørkdahl; Speciesism as doxic practice versus valuing…

The Green Criminology Monthly #3 – November 2012

This is the third issue of The Green Criminology Monthly by the IGCWG. Written and reviewed by the members of the International Green Criminology Working Group, The Green Criminology Monthly is a source of original research and publication on green criminology, environmental crime, and other issues concerning criminology. Each month a issue of this publication will be posted to our blog.

The article is available below in its full form, and is also available as a downloadable PDF and DOC file on our Monthly Archive Page.

Pushing the boundaries of (a) Green Criminology:
Environmental harm as a cause of crime.
Dr. Gary R. Potter
Department of Social Sciences
London South Bank University
Elsewhere on this site, I have addressed the question ‘What is Green Criminology?’, but here I want to suggest that my previous definition, whilst reflecting much (probably most, but by no means all) of the work of green criminologists to date, perhaps sells the idea of a green criminology short. Rather than seeing green criminology as “the analysis of environmental harms from a criminological perspective, or the application of criminological thought to environmental issues”, perhaps a better definition – or conceptual framework – would be the application of an ecological perspective to the problem of ‘crime’ in general. This can encompass everything within the earlier definition, but can also include a whole lot more. To put it another way, I would like to suggest that there is more to a green criminology than just the focus on green crime.

Let us explore this idea further by reference to one well-established typology of ‘green crime’ developed by Nigel South and colleagues in the book “Criminology: A Sociological Introduction” (Carrabine et al. 2004, Routledge). This contribution is particularly noteworthy as the first example of green criminology covered in some depth in a general criminology textbook, but is useful for current…

Watch the Presentations From the First ESRC Green Criminology Research Seminar

The first of six ESRC sponsored Green Criminology Research Seminar’s took place on October 20th at Northumbria University. This seminar, titled “Green Criminology; Theories and Concepts”, covered the recent evolution of Green Criminology as a field of study. Presentations were given by two International Green Criminology Working Group members at the seminar. Dr. Nigel South presented on “the historical evolution of theories and concepts of green criminology as well as the contemporary formulations that this emerging field addresses.” Dr. Avi Brisman also gave a presentation on the interdisciplinary nature of green criminology and how that contributes to its strength.

Both presentations are available in full in video form below. You can view and download their presentations at the ESRC site here.

Pro Vice Chancellor Nigel South

Dr Avi Brisman

The next seminar in the ESRC Green Criminology Research Seminar Series will take place in February 2013 at Glamorgan University, in Cardiff, Whales. Registration will begin later this year with a small fee (~£10). More information is available here.

We would like to thank the ESRC for providing t…

ESRC Green Crime Seminar Series

We would like to announce a new seminar series led by four IGCWG members and Matthew Hall:

The Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) Green Criminology Research Seminar Series led by Dr Tanya Wyatt of Northumbria University, Dr Gary Potter of London Southbank University, Dr Angus Nurse of Birmingham City University, Dr Matthew Hall of University of Sheffield and Pro Vice Chancellor Nigel South of University of Essex.

The UK based series consists of five half-day seminars and one 2-day mini-conference. The seminars will take place every term until August 2014 in different locations around the country. They will each have two invited speakers depending on the topic. It is not possible to cover all the facets, so the series will focus primarily on: 1.) Green Criminology Theories and Concepts; 2.) Wildlife and Timber Trafficking; 3.) Animal Abuse and Wildlife Crime; 4.) Hazardous Waste and Pollution; and 5.) Environmental Law and Regulation. The July 2014 mini-conference will have sessions on each of these themes and time devoted to those aspects of Green Criminology not covered elsewhere in the series, such as methodological challenges, environmental conflict, and bio-piracy. The final conference will also have a session devoted to plans for future collaborative research, publications, and an annual conference.

The first seminar is on October 20th, 2012 at Northumbria University. This seminar is titled ‘Green Criminology: Theories and Concepts’ and will feature two keynote speakers as well as time for networking and discussion. Dr. Avi Brisman, School of Justice Studies, Assistant Professor, Eastern Kentucky University (US) and Professor Nigel South, Sociology, Pro-Vice Chancellor, University of Essex will explore the analytical and theoretical strands of green criminological thought such as environmental, ecological, and species justice, which help to define the field and set it apart from mainstream criminology.

General attendance is welcom…

The Green Criminology Monthly #2 – October 2012

Welcome to the second publication of The Green Criminology Monthly. Written and reviewed by the members of the International Green Criminology Working Group, The Green Criminology Monthly is a source of original research and publication on green criminology, environmental crime, and other issues concerning criminology. Each month a issue of this publication will be posted to our blog.

This article was written by Melissa Jarrell, a member of the IGCWG who attended last month’s Environmental Crime and its Victims conference in the Netherlands. In this month’s issue she provides a overview of the presentations and themes that were present at the conference and what it means for Green Criminology.

GreenCriminology.org is hosting the Book of Abstracts and presentations from this year’s Environmental Crime and its Victims Conference- including the presentations mentioned in this article. If you would like to view these presentations in their original form for further reference please visit our Conferences Papers and Presentations database. A sincere thanks goes to the conference organizers for providing these resources.

The article is available below in its full form, and is also available as a downloadable PDF and DOC file on our Monthly Archive Page.

Overview of Environmental Crime and its Victims Conference in Delft, Netherlands
Melissa Jarrell
Department of Social Sciences
Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi
 

September 17-18: Environmental Crime and its Victims Conference in Delft, Netherlands

 

A great big THANK YOU to the conference organizers: Toine Spapens, Rob White, and Marieke Kluin as well as our hosts: Delft University of Technology and the Police Academy of the Netherlands! To read about the conference, view photos, and review conference abstracts, go to: http://www.environmentalcrimeseminar.com/home.html

 

This international conference brought together approximately eighty academics and…

Welcome to the new website for the International Green Criminology Working Group!

Welcome to the new website for the IGCWG. This site hopes to serve not only as a headquarter for the group, but also as a general educational site about Green Criminology. We have lots of resources available for students, teachers, and anyone else interested in the topic – including a dictionary of terms related to Green Criminology and the environment, a database of free to use images, a blog of environmental news, and more.One of the features we are most proud of is the Green Criminology Monthly. This is a free online journal written and published once a month by the members of the IGCWG. Our first issue, Contested Illnesses: A Review and Implications for Green Criminology by Michael J. Lynch, is out now.

We also have a forum for discussion of group activity, and Green Criminology news and events. Its free to join the IGCWG and participate in the group, and can easily be done by following our registration link.

GreenCriminology.org is a continual work in progress – over time we will be updating and expanding our databases with new content, with out ultimate goal to be the best educational resource for Green Criminology on the Internet. If you have any content you would like to submit, or any suggestions, please email us at greencriminology @ gmail.com, and we will get back to you quickly.

This site was made possible by generous donations from members and people who contributed to our Kickstarter. The Kickstarter project was launched on June 18th, 2012, after months of planning and closed a month later on July 18th, reaching 115% of its funding goal. The Kickstarter project was developed by Michael J. Lynch and Vincent Lynch, and the website developed by Vincent…

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